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UPCOMING EDITION

Art Stage Singapore 2017 will present the second Southeast Asia Forum, which will focus on the theme of capitalism, titled Net Present Value: Art, Capital, Futures.

The late Joseph Beuys (1921–1986) believed in the imaginative potential in each individual and in the power of art to radically transform everyday society. He saw capital as “human dignity and creativity” and championed the importance of developing “a concept of money that allows creativity, or art, so to speak, to be capital.” Thirty years after Beuys’ death, in the age of finance, we reflect on what ‘capital’ means today in relationship to art, society and the present future. 
 
‘Net Present Value’ is a method commonly used to forecast the profitability of future returns on investments made today. Simply put, it is a future value expressed in today’s terms. The second Southeast Asia Forum seeks to explore the values of art, imagination and progress, and, the price of doing business as usual in the global capitalist system. It examines relationships between money, ideals and some of the fault lines in the present financial age, including the Forum’s immediate sphere of influence — the art market and the value of creativity. 
 
The Forum’s exhibition surveys impacts of economic development on governance, cultures, beliefs, social relations and daily life, focusing on the milieu of Southeast Asia, as countries race to establish their place in the league of global economies. Through the works of socially engaged artists, most of whom are from the region, the exhibition emphasises the importance of cultivating alternative forms of capital and conditions for the evolution of societies in an increasingly complex global environment. 
 
Drastic transformations in economic systems or rapid globalisation of economies provoked intense responses from these artists who, through diverse forms of art and design practices, show how processes of capitalisation and globalisation — historic and contemporary — have brought dramatic changes in terms of power relations and social structures, intranational and transnational, and how such processes often lead to the widespread devastation of lived environments and experiences. Several of the artists, in their works, remonstrate against the profound and far-reaching consequences of global capitalism — declining social protection, rising statism, militarised accumulation, forced migration — and commemorate the silent or invisible victims of these processes. A number of works are motivated by questions about contemporary art in itself and seek to trigger discussions on the commodification and consumption of art and the symptomatic portrayal of artists as creators versus artists as capitalists. 
 
The Forum’s series of lectures and panel discussions will bring together speakers from the art community and the social sciences to examine, through different perspectives, challenges relating to cultures of financialisation and their impact on how we consider art and capital in the immediate future. In creating encounters between critics, actors and influencers who will discuss issues relating to financial literacy and the economics of art, the Forum seeks to bring about more inter-disciplinary understanding and collaboration in re-imagining conditions and values for art and capital in 21st century society. 

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EXHIBITING ARTISTS & GALLERIES

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ANON PAIROT

Thailand
GALLERY SEESCAPE

Weapons for the Citizen, 2016, Toy guns fabricated from assorted textiles made in Thailand, Variable dimensions.
Image courtesy of the artist and Gallery Seescape.

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CARLOS CELDRAN

Philippines
1335MABINI

Livin' La Vida Imelda, Performance.
Image courtesy of the artist.

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ELDWIN PRADIPTA

Indonesia
LAWANGWANGI

Waterkasteel: Canto, 2015, Installation, video projection, bird cage, chicken cage, 100 x 200 x 100 cm (object), 480 x 360 cm, 2’, looped (video projection).
Image courtesy of the artist.

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EMILY PHYO

Myanmar
MYANM/ART

Being 236 — Being Than Than (Shwedagon Pagoda maintenance staff), 2015, Smartphone photograph posted on Instagram.
Image courtesy of the artist.

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HEMAN CHONG

Malaysia/Singapore
FOST GALLERY

THIS PAVILION IS STRICTLY FOR COMMUNITY BONDING ACTIVITIES ONLY, 2015, Vinyl letters, aluminium plate, gloss lamination, 45 x 60 cm.
Image courtesy of the artist and FOST Gallery.

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IVAN LAM

Malaysia
WEI-LING GALLERY

COMA 38/500, 2013, Vending machine, 38 individual artworks in 500 Perspex boxes, aluminium etched plates, vinyl decals, 183 x 122 x 79 cm.
Image courtesy of the artist and Wei-Ling Gallery.

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JAKKAI SIRIBUTR

Thailand
SA SA BASSAC & YAVUZ GALLERY

Fast Fashion, 2015, Constructed garments, hand embroidery, Approx. 58 x 53 cm each.
Image courtesy of the artist and SA SA BASSAC.

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JENNY HOLZER

USA
PEARL LAM GALLERIES

Truisms - Money Creates Taste, 2013, Sichuan Deep White marble bench, 43.2 x 154.9 x 64.5 cm.
Image courtesy of the artist and Pearl Lam Galleries.

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JIM ALLEN ABEL

Indonesia
YEO WORKSHOP

Motorcycle Diaries, 2010, Mirrors from motorcycles, photography, 220 x 200 x 180 cm.
Image courtesy of the artist and Yeo Workshop.

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JOSE TENCE RUIZ

Philippines
ARTINFORMAL

CSI: Chimoy si Imbisibol Hugas Kotse, 2007, MYK electrostatic print on canvas, 122 x 244 cm.
Photography and digital manipulation: Jose Tence Ruiz in collaboration with Nar Cabico (model).
Image courtesy of the artist and Artinformal.

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KENT CHAN

Singapore
GREY PROJECTS

If Not, Accelerate, 2016, Two-channel video, 37'42 (Still, left-channel).
Image courtesy of the artist and Grey Projects.

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KRAY CHEN

Singapore
GREY PROJECTS

Prime Numbers, 2016, Seven-segment digit panels, custom software, 21 x 52 cm.
Image courtesy of the artist and Grey Projects.

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NEW-TERRITORIES

France
TARS GALLERY

Liminal, 2016, Black carbon, variable dimensions.
Image courtesy of New-Territories / M4 / RMIT and TARS Gallery.

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NOBERTO ROLDAN

Philippines
TAKSU

Hornet, 2014, Oil and acrylic on canvas, diptych, 182.88 x 182.88 cm or 91.44 x 365.76 cm.
Image courtesy of the artist.

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RICHARD KRIESCHE

Austria
GALERIE ZIMMERMANN KRATOCHWILL

From the series, Aesthetics of Capital - Capital + Code, 2007, C-print on dibond, edition of 3, 50 x 70 cm.
Image courtesy of the artist.

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SVAY SARETH

Cambodia
SA SA BASSAC

"I, Svay Sareth, eat rubber sandals", 2015, performance, single-channel HD video, colour, sound, 9'46", looped.
Image courtesy of the artist and SA SA BASSAC.

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TAN PEILING & VANESSA BAN

Singapore

Visualisation of Lands of Progression (II), 2013 - 2017, Dot matrix printer, laptop, steel structure, Variable dimensions.
Image courtesy of the artists.

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THAN SOK

Cambodia
SA SA BASSAC

Promotion (Cash), 2013, United States one-dollar bill, watercolour on paper, 50 x 60 cm.
Image courtesy of the artist and SA SA BASSAC.

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TINTIN WULIA

Indonesia/Australia
MILANI GALLERY

Untold Movements - Act 1: Neitherland, Whitherland, Hitherland, 2015, 32-channel surround sound installation, Variable dimensions.
This work was commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art with the assistance of The Keir Foundation.
Image courtesy of Justin Malinowski.

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TRONG GIA NGUYEN

Vietnam/USA
GALERIE QUYNH

Video stills of Artists Commercials (Nouveau Ghetto), 2017, Three-channel HD video installation.
Image courtesy of the artist and Galerie Quynh.

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YOSHINORI NIWA

Japan
1335MABINI

Video still of Selling the Right to Name a Pile of Garbage, 2014, Single-channel video, 25'43".
Image courtesy of the artist.

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YUDI SULISTYO

Indonesia
PEARL LAM GALLERIES

Out of Control, 2016, Cardboard, plastic pipe, wood, steel, acrylic, paint, 153 x 440 x 334 cm.
Image courtesy of the artist and Pearl Lam Galleries.


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TALKS PROGRAMME

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The Free and the Brave: Artist-initiated Spaces and Platforms

A two-part session on independent art initiatives in Southeast Asia

 

 



Artist-initiated spaces and platforms have been pioneers in creating the art ecologies of Southeast Asia. With a do-it-yourself strategy, various spaces have and continue to offer artists, researchers, and curators opportunities for experimentation and questioning of the status quo. Often framed as “independent,” however, these spaces still must face the mundane requirements of maintenance such as rent, labour, utilities, production, and other resources. This panel will discuss why various platforms came into being, how their structures allow for flexibility and adaptation, how their priorities shape and have been shaped by ideas about their communities near and far, and how they have navigated the demands of capital and the mundane.

 

Panellists:
Nathalie Johnston
Curator, Researcher and Director, Myanm/art, Yangon

Norberto Roldan
Artist and Artistic Director, Green Papaya Art Projects, Manila

Grace Samboh
Independent Curator and Researcher, Hyphen, Yogyakarta

Jason Wee
Artist, Curator, Writer and Founder, Grey Projects, Singapore

Moderator:
Chuong-Dài Võ
Researcher, Asia Art Archive, Hong Kong

 

Date: Thursday, 12 January 2017
Time: 2:00pm - 3:45pm (including an introduction by Art Stage)
Venue: Marina Bay Sands, Sands Expo & Convention Centre, Level 3, Angsana Room (3E and 3F), 10 Bayfront Avenue

Admission is free. Please register here.

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The Free and the Brave: Privately Founded and Funded Institutions

A two-part session on independent art initiatives in Southeast Asia

 

 


Art centres are on the move in Southeast Asia, as museums, galleries, and cultural spaces multiply and think big. Privately founded and funded organisations can and do play a significant role in shaping the cultural identities and priorities of their communities and beyond. With a focus on four organisations — three of which are new — this panel enquires into how such organisations are constructing themselves in their localities and the larger art scenes, leveraging their funding models and strategies for sustainable development, and negotiating the advantages and challenges of their positions.

 

Panellists:
Zoe Butt
Artistic Director, The Factory Contemporary Arts Centre, Ho Chi Minh City

Gridthiya Gaweewong
Artistic Director, Jim Thompson Art Centre, Bangkok / Consultant and guest curator, MAIIAM Contemporary Art Museum, Chiang Mai

Aaron Seeto
Director, Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Nusantara, Jakarta

Moderator:
Chuong-Dài Võ
Researcher, Asia Art Archive, Hong Kong
 

Date: Thursday, 12 January 2017
Time: 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Venue: Marina Bay Sands, Sands Expo & Convention Centre, Level 3, Angsana Room (3E and 3F), 10 Bayfront Avenue

Admission is free. Please register here.

 

**Post-Session Event
Book Launch of SouthEastAsia: Spaces fo the Curatorial

Venue: 5:30pm - 6:00pm

This session will be followed by the first launch in Southeast Asia of the anthology SouthEastAsia: Spaces of the Curatorial, published by Sternberg Press. The book will be introduced by the co-editor of the book, Professor Ute Meta Bauer, Founding Director of NTU CCA Singapore, in the presence of several of the publication's contributors.

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Art + Money – A Dangerous Liaison?

Andy Warhol famously predicted that “making money is art and working is art and good business is the best art.” Today, the global art economy largely operates on the same principle as the luxury market and the financial industry: commodities are validated by money and brand pedigrees — artists, galleries, international exhibitions, fairs, institutions, art degrees — are sought after by the “super tax” bracket for social currency and speculation. The unbridled excess of art produced on demand to keep up with the worldwide proliferation of commercial platforms and dealers, comes at the expense of possibly losing generations of art as a form of socio-political agency.

This conversation with Alain Servais, a collector who advocates engaging with art for its power to challenge, and Franz Schultheis, (co-)author of books including What People Do for Art? and When Art Meets Money: Encounters at Art Basel, probes the art market’s often opaque modus operandi and asks some inconvenient questions: why should one buy art? What kind of art is worth collecting? Are fairs and galleries ruining art? Should the art market be regulated? Who should regulate it?

 

Panellists:
Franz Schultheis
Professor of Sociology, University of St. Gallen

Alain Servais
Investment Banker, Entrepreneur and Collector, Brussels

Host:
Lorenzo Rudolf
Founder and President, Art Stage, Singapore and Jakarta

 

Date: Friday, 13 January 2017
Time: 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Venue: Marina Bay Sands, Sands Expo & Convention Centre,
Level 3, Angsana Room (3E and 3F), 10 Bayfront Avenue

Admission is free. Please register here.

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Artists in the Age of Oligarchy

Is globalisation coming to an end? Or is it revealing its true face as oligarchy? As the EU is disintegrating and the USA is withdrawing from their former role as world police, the grand narrative of the second half of the 20th century, namely the international connection of democracies to supranational unities, is giving way to protectionism, fundamentalism, and oligarchy.


How does this shift affect the realm of art? Will the fortification of borders and the erection of walls disrupt the mobility and cosmopolitanism of artists, force them to withdraw, lead them to protest? Or will they welcome the “call to order” and be inspired to focus on cultural specificities? Will the vanishing of the middle class and its loss of access to the benefits of globalisation entail the collapse of art as we know it since the mid-19th century? Or will the rise of the oligarchs prompt a new prosperity of the arts in the service of power, as in the age of Baroque? Will art take the role of a critical avant-garde where alternative ways of life are envisioned? Or will it provide the decorum of the new elite? This session is an occasion to speculate about the future role of artists and discuss the challenges and options that they are facing.

 

Panellists:
Trong Gia Nguyen
Artist

Yoshinori Niwa
Artist

Beatrix Ruf
Director, Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam

Moderator:
Philip Ursprung
Chair of the History of Art and Architecture, ETH Zurich
 

Date: Friday, 13 January 2017
Time: 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Venue: Marina Bay Sands, Sands Expo & Convention Centre,
Level 3, Angsana Room (3E and 3F), 10 Bayfront Avenue

Admission is free. Please register here.

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The Future of Art and Money

This session comprises two presentations, first by Max Haiven, followed by Suhail Malik. Questions will be saved for the discussion with both speakers after the second presentation.

Art after Money, Money after Art:
Radical Creative Strategies against Financialisation

Speaker:
Max Haiven
Canada Research Chair in Culture, Media and Social Justice, Lakehead University

While we are accustomed to and comfortable with imagining money and art as opposites, the one beholden to the base and material, the other to the spiritual and the enlightened, this talk makes a strong case for bringing the two into critical proximity and watching the sparks fly. Capitalism has always relied upon art in various, historically specific ways. Today, under the order of “financialisation” (1973–present), where transnational financial flows have more power than ever, money and art are transforming one another in profound new ways.

To grasp this shift, this talk applies three terms for the analysis of contemporary art (conceptualism, dematerialisation and relationality) to the transformations of finance capital, and then three terms for the analysis of finance (speculation, securitisation and the derivative) to the field of contemporary art. It seeks to answer the question: what can radical art do in an age of financial totalitarianism?

Post-Globalisation or Post Neoliberalism? The Case of the Art Market

Speaker:
Suhail Malik
Co-Director, MFA Fine Art, Goldsmiths

The transnational art market presents an instructive test case for what will happen to globalised commerce and culture after the 2016 shocks of Brexit and Trump. These shocks signal the likelihood of a fundamental transformation to the neoliberal globalisation that has effectively shaped every region of the planet over the past forty years. The prospect now is of a period of increasing trade and capital barriers, and increased ethnonational border enforcement, all led from the North Atlantic. Combined, the result will be the demise of either globalisation or of neoliberalism as we have known them. Or of both together.

Though contemporary art and its market are minor elements in this phase shift of a global political economy, their commercial and cultural transnationalism represent among the best (or worst) of the neoliberal globalism that is now entering a terminal phase. The impending period of post-globalism and/or post-neoliberalism will significantly impact art’s crossborder market formations. And the impact extends beyond commercial considerations: more than any other agency, it is the transnational art market that has for some time given art significance — the period, precisely, of neoliberal globalism’s entrenchment. How then will post-neoliberalism and/or post-globalisation effect the construction of art’s significance at transnational scales?

 

Date: Saturday, 14 January 2017
Time: 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Venue: Marina Bay Sands, Sands Expo & Convention Centre,
Level 3, Angsana Room (3E and 3F), 10 Bayfront Avenue

Admission is free. Please register here.

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Disruption by Design: Challenging the Commercial Capture of Creativity

That there seems to be less artistic innovation of consequence today, is among other factors, due to a contradictory perception regarding art’s relationship to commerce. Where many artists have trouble seeing themselves as entrepreneurs, the applied arts are trained to be attuned to the changing realities of the commercial world. Design in particular has been steadily making more cultural impact on society. However, it too cannot avoid the commercialisation of creativity.

Rapidly developing digital technologies are being harnessed by some businesses to break out of this cast of commercialisation, which typically inundates markets with trendier iterations of the same tried-and-tested idea. By using such technologies to converse directly with their consumers to find out what they really want, outcomes made possible include: swift introduction to market, failure that is not fatal, and perhaps most significantly, social benefits become just as important business objectives as commercial profit.


In this session, three design and business innovators discuss how creative capacities can be strategically capitalised to engineer such “preferred futures”. As disruptions become a normal state of affairs in our increasingly complex world, is it possible for socially beneficial disruptions to stay true to their course? Or will they eventually become part of the establishment? What would this mean for existing market, education and learning systems? Are there lessons for art here?

 

Panellists:
Vikram Channa
Vice President, Production and Development / Commercial Partnerships, Discovery Networks Asia-Pacific

Don McIntyre
Design Director, Institute of Design Innovation,
Glasgow School of Art

Joel Yarbrough
Head of Payments and Commerce Partnerships, Grab

Moderator:
Henry Middleton

 

Date: Saturday, 14 January 2017
Time: 5:00pm - 6:30pm
Venue: Marina Bay Sands, Sands Expo & Convention Centre
Level 3, Angsana Room (3E and 3F), 10 Bayfront Avenue

Admission is free. Please register here.

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Aesop x Art Stage Singapore: Art Elocution

Traditionally a medium valued for depicting reality, photography has ironically contributed to the ubiquitous artifice that defines today’s global capitalist culture. Affordable access to image-making technology and the proliferation of digital platforms have changed how we think of the “real”, altering the value of an image and the definition of authorship.

Is photography art? While photography is increasingly seen in art exhibitions and fairs throughout the Southeast Asian region, only some kinds of photography “make it” as art, often a consequence of commercially driven validation.

In this conversation, presented as an event of the second volume of Southeast Asia Forum, curator Enin Supriyanto (Indonesia) and Zhuang Wubin (Singapore), author of Photography in Southeast Asia: A Surveyattempt to make a case for photography’s importance in art and politics in the region.

 

Date
Saturday, 14 January 2017

Time
11:00am - 12:30pm

Venue
Aesop ION, ION Orchard, 2 Orchard Turn, #B3-66/66A, Singapore 238801

Admission
Free. Limited seats. Please register via vip@artstagesingapore.com.


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PERFORMANCE

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Livin' La Vida Imelda

Livin’ La Vida Imelda by Carlos Celdran is a multi-site “walking performance” held in seven acts across seven different places in the exhibition venue of Art Stage Singapore. Carlos will adopt selected artworks in the fair as a starting point for a larger narrative and a literal background for his piece. Using the flamboyant former first lady of the Philippines, Imelda Marcos, and her grandiose projects as reference, Carlos will examine a period when geopolitics and contemporary art intersected — sometimes with tragic consequences for the Philippines.
Armed with a book of vintage photographs, dressed in bell bottom jeans, and carrying a small boom box playing disco music, Carlos will take guests on a journey that hopes to illuminate the Filipino experience of the 1970s, a time when the direction of his country’s art, culture and national identity were dictated by the ambitions and follies of one woman.

 

Date: Thursday, 12 January 2017
Time: 6.00pm - 7.00pm
Register here

Date: Friday, 13 January 2017
Time: 6.00pm - 7.00pm
Register here

Date: Saturday, 14 January 2017
Time: 4.00pm - 5.00pm
Register here

Date: Sunday, 15 January 2017
Time: 3.00pm - 4.00pm
Register here

Venue: Art Stage Singapore 2017,
Southeast Asia Forum Exhibition Square,
Basement 2, Hall F, 10 Bayfront Avenue,
Marina Bay Sands, Sands Expo & Convention Centre


REQUIREMENT: AN ADMISSION TICKET TO ART STAGE SINGAPORE VALID FOR THE DAY OF THE PERFORMANCE.

This performance takes place within the exhibition premises of Art Stage Singapore 2017.

Ticketed admission to the exhibition applies. Find out more here.

Places are limited (up to 16 persons per performance).

Please arrive 5 minutes before the performance starts at the Southeast Asia Forum Exhibition Square (Hall F).

Due to the roaming nature of the performance, we regret that late-comers will not be able to join the group once it sets off.


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PAST EDITION

In its 2016 edition, Art Stage Singapore introduced the Southeast Asia Forum. It emphasised the balance between art, commerce and content within larger society by taking a more focused and deeper view into broad global issues that also affect our immediate region and lives.

Title Seismograph: Sensing the City – Art in the Urban Age, the inaugural Southeast Asia Forum comprised two symbiotic parts – a ticketed selling exhibition and a series of talks that is open to the public. 
 
The talks brought together architects, urbanists, social scientists, men and women of letters and artists to examine the challenges of urbanisation and how cities can be re-imagined. 
 
The exhibition featured 19 socially engaged artists from Southeast Asia who delved into issues and sentiments relating to extremely rapid urbanisation and to the evolution of contemporary society in their own countries. 
Download the full brochure (incl. programme and talks schedule) for the Southeast Asia Forum here. 

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VIDEOS

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21 January 2016, Thursday

Southeast Asia Forum Opening Speech by Lorenzo Rudolf

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21 January 2016, Thursday

Artist and Society in the Urban Age

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21 January 2016, Thursday

Do Museums Make Global Citizens

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21 January 2016, Thursday

Global Opinion Leader Series: Art World - Quo Vadis?

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22 January 2016, Friday

What Are the Challenges in Leading an Art Museum in the Psychogeography of the 2...

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23 January 2016, Saturday

The Great Creative City Race - Can Creativity Save the City?

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23 January 2016, Saturday

Who Owns the City?

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23 January 2016, Saturday

The Present Cultural Revolution - Art, Space and Social Contract in the Current ...

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24 January 2016, Sunday

Interruption Patterns: Artists and Public Space in Southeast Asian Cities

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24 January 2016, Sunday

"The Spirit of Cities: Why the identity of a City Matters in a Global Age"


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